theantidote:

Cartographic Polyrhythms (2) Emma McNally
digital hybrid from drawing (graphite/carbon on paper)
‘Below the level of the musical note lies the realm of microsound, of sound particles lasting less than one-tenth of a second. Recent technological advances allow us to probe and manipulate these pinpoints of sound, dissolving the traditional building blocks of music—notes and their intervals—into a more fluid and supple medium. The sensations of point, pulse (series of points), line (tone), and surface (texture) emerge as particle density increases. Sounds coalesce, evaporate, and mutate into other sounds.’ Curtis Roads ‘Microsound’

cartographic polyrhythm (8)

The work of Emma McNally is another great case of an artistic embracement of Complexity and Systems Theory, resulting in a slow detachment of these domains from their exclusive scientific realm. It’s quite remarkable when this adoption takes the shape of randomized algorithms in Generative Art, but it’s even more astounding when it’s expressed by means of hand-drawn illustrations.
The stunning graphite illustrations of Emma McNally convey a sort of cartographic conjecture, with imaginary planes and connections, intersecting squares, circles and dots. These abstract lines, shapes, and patterns make for some striking textures and resemble classic mappings of cyberspace through nodal connections of imagined networks.
(via artemisdreaming:)

theantidote:

Cartographic Polyrhythms (2) Emma McNally

digital hybrid from drawing (graphite/carbon on paper)

‘Below the level of the musical note lies the realm of microsound, of sound particles lasting less than one-tenth of a second. Recent technological advances allow us to probe and manipulate these pinpoints of sound, dissolving the traditional building blocks of music—notes and their intervals—into a more fluid and supple medium. The sensations of point, pulse (series of points), line (tone), and surface (texture) emerge as particle density increases. Sounds coalesce, evaporate, and mutate into other sounds.’ Curtis Roads ‘Microsound’

cartographic polyrhythm (8)

The work of Emma McNally is another great case of an artistic embracement of Complexity and Systems Theory, resulting in a slow detachment of these domains from their exclusive scientific realm. It’s quite remarkable when this adoption takes the shape of randomized algorithms in Generative Art, but it’s even more astounding when it’s expressed by means of hand-drawn illustrations.

The stunning graphite illustrations of Emma McNally convey a sort of cartographic conjecture, with imaginary planes and connections, intersecting squares, circles and dots. These abstract lines, shapes, and patterns make for some striking textures and resemble classic mappings of cyberspace through nodal connections of imagined networks.

(via artemisdreaming:)